It Keeps Going

I have read every Drizzt Do’Urden novel written by R.A. Salvatore. Well, all of them except for Boundless (the newest one) anyway, and (as of this writing) I’m halfway through it. To those out there that don’t know the character of Drizzt, that may not seem like a big deal, but it kinda is. You see, Boundless is the 35th book in the series.

R.A. Salvatore is one of my favorite authors. Everything of his that I’ve read has been good. His worst book is still better than most people’s best. And Drizzt Do’Urden is one of the most dynamic characters in fiction. He is guided by a morality that is deeper than any other fictional character I’ve ever read.

With all of that being said, I have one piece of advice that I would give to Mr. Salvatore: Please stop.

As much as I enjoy reading his books, it’s a little too much. It’s been going on far too long. All of the stories feel recycled. He does a good job of changing the details just enough to keep it interesting, but the basic stories are the same.

Also, with the exception of Drizzt (and one or two others), he has killed off every major character in the series and brought them back to life. Some of them more than once.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I’ll keep reading them as long as he keeps writing them. That’s how good he is at what he does. Despite these problems I have with his stories, I still really enjoy his writing. But, I stopped buying them a while back and now I wait until I can check them out from the library.

From what I have seen, there’s one more, the 36th in the series, that has been announced. I hope he ends it there. 36 books is more than enough stories about the same character.

Versus: Fiction’s Greatest Wizard

My last couple of post have been leading up to this one. I’ve been asking you all to submit your picks for who you think is Fiction’s Greatest Wizard. There are quite a few choices. Many wizards have captured our imaginations throughout books, movies, or video games. Boiling them down to one choice will be a difficult task, so we’ll let our poll try to sort it out for us.

The choices will be posted in the order I received them. One of them is from a guy I work with that doesn’t blog, but I’m not holding that against him. If his pick wins, I might even tell him about it. The argument I will put down for his pick will be a direct quote. Also, I’ll be leaving the poll open for two weeks.

djmatticus – Raistlin Majere. He defeated gods with his magic. Case closed.

Jodi Greenfield –  I would have to say that Harry Potter is my favorite because he started out as an ‘underdog’ and had to learn everything. Also, he was a Wizard with a good heart, and not an overblown ego. IMHO.

Juliette Kings – Myridden Emrys — or as he would later be known, Merlin in the “Crystal Cave” by Mary Stewart. I keep coming back to this book that I first read thirty years ago. Merlin is believable and real. Like all of us he has his frustrations and suffers to do what is right. He is the wizard of all wizards, but in a strange way I can relate to him.

Dan – Although I’ve fallen behind on the books, Harry Dresden from The Dresden Files because he flies by the seat of his pants and is a bit rough around the edges. I like that he’s a Private Investigator as well as a wizard and the crossover with both worlds throughout the books. Plus his Amazon Echo is a spirit friend who lives in a skull.

Guy I work with – “Gandalf. Because he’s fuckin’ Gandalf.”

Revis – Gromph Baenre. He’s the most powerful wizard among the drow, the most feared race in the Forgotten Realms.

 

A Surprising Discovery

My wife and I have been slowly, but surely (and stop calling me Shirley), cleaning out our second bedroom to make room for baby stuph. This weekend, my main goal was to move my bookshelves out. Since I have a lot of books, this was no easy task. I was able to do it, and while I was moving them out, I noticed something.

I figured that the author that I had the most books from would either be Michael Connelly or Harlan Coben. To my surprise, it wasn’t. The most books I had from one author turned out to be R. A. Salvatore, which is someone most of you have probably never heard of.

R. A. Salvatore is most known for writing novels set in the Dungeons and Dragons setting of Forgotten Realms. He has also written some fantasy books outside of that setting, but I have yet to read any of those. A few people out there might know him because of the two Star Wars books he’s written: Vector Prime (which is the beginning of the New Jedi Order series) and the book adaptation of Attack of the Clones (which I have yet to read, but I’m sure he made it more interesting than the movie version).

His writing style is very unique. Even though the settings of his books are fantasy worlds, whether it is Forgotten Realms or Star Wars, he has a way of pulling you into them. His characters are always multi-faceted and compelling. He is also the best I have ever read at describing action or fighting scenes.

If you ever feel like reading one of his books, I would suggest starting with the books of the Dark Elf trilogy, as it is the beginnings his most famous character, Drizzt Do’ Urden. If you’re anything like me, after you read the first Drizzt book, you’ll want to read the rest, which means reading at least 15 more books.