Relentless – Update

R.A. Salvatore is one of my favorite authors. There has yet to be anything that he’s written that I haven’t liked. Unfortunately, I’m afraid that streak is about to come to an end with his newest novel, Relentless.

Granted, I’m only a little more than 100 pages into it, but I’m having trouble working up the desire to finish it. Normally, I can’t put his work down. There have been many times when I’ve read an entire novel within a day or two because I don’t want to stop reading. When I did have to put them down, for whatever reason, I couldn’t wait to pick them back up so I could continue on. With this one, though, I don’t think it would bother me that much if I didn’t read any more of it.

The problem is not with the writing, I think. R.A. still puts sentences together very well. He paints very vivid and imaginative battle sequences that are among the best I’ve ever read, if not the best. His character building is among the best as well.

I think the problem is that this is book 36 in the series. That’s right. Book 36. There has been so many things that have happened in those 36 books, so much story, so many fights, that they’re all kind of blurring together at this point. There have been a few times in those 100 pages when I had to stop and try to remember things that happened in the last book because I couldn’t figure out what was going on. And only half of those remembering attempts were successful.

For now, I’m planning on continuing with the book, but I don’t know for how much longer. While I don’t want to quit on it, I also don’t want to keep reading something that I’m not enjoying. And, right now, I’m not really enjoying it very much.

Update

I stopped reading this book. The further into it I got, the more I realized that I just didn’t care anymore about what was going to happen. After 36 books, I just can’t invest anything else into these characters.

Things I Should Not Be Subjected To: You Know…

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, my brother, Jaded, and I did the Stuph Blog thing. While doing it, he had a series of posts about things he shouldn’t be subjected to which was cleverly entitled Things I Should Not Be Subjected To. I think I did one or two of them along the way as well, but it was mostly him. When it came time to think of something new to post, I thought about doing one from an old series that I haven’t done in a while. When I saw this series in the category list, I knew there was something that needed to be done. Not only is this a thing that I shouldn’t be subjected to, it’s universal. This one covers everybody.

2020.

Nobody should be subjected to this cluster@#$% of a year.

Here I Am

It’s been a long time since I’ve posted on this blog with any regularity. There are a few reasons for this.

Life, for one, is the biggest contributor to my lack of posting. Between work and family time, there’s not always enough time to make for writing here. Working an 8 hour shift then coming home to take over teaching duties from Mrs. Revis (along with doing all the other things that need to be done around the house) doesn’t leave much freedom to sit in front of a keyboard. Hell, the only reason I was able to throw my last post together was because it only took me 2 minutes to do it. All I did was use the text predictor on my phone to throw a few random paragraphs together.

Another reason is my offline writing. Almost all of my writing nowadays is on projects that I plan on publishing someday. Most of that writing is done on my phone at work during my breaks and, quite frankly, that takes much longer than it would if I were trying to do it on my computer. You’d think I’d be better at typing on my phone with how much I do it, but I’m still not very good at it.

Since I’m talking about my offline writing, I feel like I should tell you that I am almost finished with the 4th installment of my Declevon Blackmoon series of stories. I’m hoping to have it done and published within the next couple of weeks. I’ll post the details when I know for sure.

Lastly, I’m just not sure what I want to do with this blog. Back when I was posting with some regularity, it was a mix of just about everything: fiction, fandom, sports, life, hypothetical situations, and anything else that invaded my mind. For the past year, or so, it’s mostly been works of fiction with a few other things mixed in here and there. I don’t know if I feel like keeping that trend up, going back to the way it used to be, or maybe trying to think of something new to do.

All I really know for sure is that I’d like to make a point of putting something up here regularly. I don’t know what that’ll be yet, but I’m hoping to be able to carve out enough time to post at least one thing a week. It may not be much, but it will be something. I’ll also do my best to not make a series of nonsensical sentences into a post again like I did a few days ago.

I make no promises, though.

The Only One Of Those Who Have Wo

I know that there’s usually a lot of turnover when it comes to getting the job done. It is the most powerful before the weekend. The grief is a little bit more than a few weeks. You can also get a little bit more information about the whole thing.

Please delete redundant information from the game. Don’t forget to take the hamburger out. Have you been drinking a lot more than you can do? Do not have a great weekend. She had a lot to learn from the other side.

Random things that are not the best. This was the first of many. Very much like a plan. Almost as if they waited until they got a call. Because… what?

Right?

Fantasy Football Finale

Well, here we are folks. We’ve reached the end of this tale. Matticus and I would very much like to thank all of you who have taken the time to read all, or even some, of this story. We hope you enjoyed it as much as we enjoyed writing it. Have a great day everyone!

First, there was blackness. Then, there was pain. It was soon followed by an unnerving numbing sensation that started off small, but slowly expanded until it enveloped his whole being. Plex didn’t know which one was worse. None of them seemed to match what he should have been feeling.
He had just killed Lavalandinarial, the dragon overlord whose tyrannical rule over his world led to the deaths of countless innocent people of all races. This should be a time when he was filled with happy feelings, not pain and then numbness. His sister and his teammates should be all around him, jumping for joy, yet here he was all alone. Something was wrong. Something was very wrong.

In a flash, it all came back to him: his sister being hit by the dragon’s tail, the cuts he sustained from debris flying up when the dragon tried to hit him with her tail, and the wounds in his back from the dragon exploding upon her death.

His first thought was of his sister. Was she alive? Was she dead? For that matter, was he alive? There was nothing around him except a vast empty space. There was light, but not much. Was this the afterlife? The elves had legends of what occurred after you died, but this didn’t match any of them.

“Wake up, damn you!”

The voice came from all around him. It was a deep voice, and one he recognized. There was a slight accent to it. For a moment, he couldn’t place it, but he finally recognized the accent as being dwarven. That was odd. The only dwarf that was coming to mind was Frukeld. This voice didn’t sound like the old dwarf, though. Who could it be?

“I said wake up, damn you!”

This time the voice was followed by a warm feeling all around him. It flowed over, under, and then finally through him. As the warmth built within him, Plex saw the area he was in begin to brighten. It was no longer an empty void. He was in the sky, surrounded by stars. Below him, clouds drifted lazily by. At the very bottom of his vision, there was a tiny dot, barely visible. Somehow, he knew that the dot was where he really was.

“I’m only going to tell you to wake up one more time before I start smacking you!”

The warmth filled him until he felt like he would explode. With one giant burst, it shot out of him in every direction. Plex felt himself falling. Looking down, he saw the dot growing bigger and bigger. Up above, the stars became smaller and smaller. His gaze drifted back down, towards his destination. It didn’t take long for him to recognize it as it came into view.

It was the arena where he had played football.

Plex’s eyes shot open as his floating form crashed into his body, which had been placed on the fifty yard line. He finally got a glimpse of the dwarf behind the voice. It was Kalant, the linebacker from his football team. Plex raised up to greet his teammate and, as soon as he did, the arena around him erupted in cheers. His jaw dropped open when he saw that the seats were filled to capacity.

“Don’t you dare pass out now,” Kalant grumbled while offering a steadying hand.

Plex gladly took it and took a moment to make sure his feet were steady under him before sweeping his gaze across the crowd. The stadium wasn’t just at capacity. It was beyond. Everyone was packed in, standing shoulder to shoulder, and extra space along the sidelines had been cleared for even more spectators. The other football teams rimmed the edge of the field. In his quick glance, he recognized many faces but the numbers were too overwhelming, the sound was too overwhelming.

Every person in that packed stadium was cheering and stomping and clapping. The sound was jubilant and somewhat terrifying.

“What is everyone cheering for?”

Plex could barely hear his own question. Kalant somehow heard it though and chuckled before replying, “For you, of course. They would have celebrated you either way but it is far better to celebrate the living.”

“Me? I didn’t do anything.”

This time Kalant laughed rather than chuckled. “Didn’t do anything? Didn’t do anything?”

Plex spun in a circle, feeling more himself, feeling stronger, he wanted to take in the whole stadium again. He wanted to see the rest of his team. He wanted to see his sister.
While he looked, Plex said, “No. I didn’t do anything. I didn’t come up with any of the plans. I didn’t gather any of the troops. I didn’t create the weapon.”

“You threw it though and you threw it true,” Kalant interrupted.

Then, before Plex could argue, Kalant went on, “You rose to the occasion and you stood against the beast, mentally and physically, when too few had the courage or resolve to do so. You inspired loyalty and you led people against the dragon. It may not have gone according to the plans Frukeld and the others had drawn up, but so what of that? Those plans were never more than an idea. And the purpose of that idea was to find someone inspiring he could take the beast down when the moment arrived.

“You, Plex. You were that champion and you did wonderfully. Not only did you just throw the spear and slay the beast but you helped create the opportunity to do so. You stood against her. You refused to let anyone else needlessly suffer. You showed us all how foolish we had been to cower before her for as long as we did.

“So, yes, they are cheering for you and I cheer for you too.”

With that, Kalant took two steps away from Plex and clapped toward the elf. Then adding his voice to the rest of the cacophony, Kalant cried out with triumph towards the sky.

Plex stared dumbfounded at the dwarf. His vision began to swim and he felt his legs go numb again. Gritting his teeth he forced himself to stand there and take in the applause he still felt he didn’t deserve.  When he felt like he couldn’t take anymore, he pushed the noise aside as best he could, banishing it from his mind, and forced his concentration on seeking out Gilania.

Why wasn’t she standing there with him? He couldn’t have done it without her. She’d found the spear and gotten it into his hands, putting herself directly at risk in doing so. His heart sank as his search continued to be fruitless. The certainty that she wasn’t alive began to sink in. Otherwise, she would have been out there with him already.

“My sister?” Plex asked, afraid of the answer.

Kalant’s face turned somber. “She lives,” he began, “but she’s in bad shape. Frukeld and his most powerful healers are doing everything they can for her as we speak. The old man seemed convinced that he could heal her, but her injuries looked pretty serious to me.”

“I’ve got to go check on her.”

“That won’t be necessary,” came a voice from behind them.

Plex whipped his head around to look at the speaker and immediately felt a wave of dizziness wash over him. He steadied himself and blinked until his vision returned to normal. When it did, he saw that it was Frukeld standing there, not Gilania. “My sister?”

“Is resting comfortably,” the old dwarf answered. “We were able to heal most of her injuries, but some of them were too great to heal completely. Her back, in particular, was bad. We managed to put her spine back together, but not before it was permanently damaged. She will likely walk with a limp for the rest of her life.”

Plex let loose a huge sigh of relief. While walking with a limp wasn’t something that anyone would want to do, it was certainly better than the alternative. “What about my injuries?” Plex asked. “If all the healers were with Gilania, who healed me?”

“I said that all of Frukeld’s healers were with her,” Kalant responded. “Not all the healers in the world.”

“When you killed the dragon,” Frukeld explained after seeing the confusion on Plex’s face, “her magical hold over people was broken. Once free from her dominance, some of the healers who were under her
thrall came to your aid.”

“And you trusted them? They could’ve been faking to get close enough to kill me.”

“We had guards there to ensure your safety. Besides, you trusted your fellow elf, didn’t you?”

Plex couldn’t argue with that. He did trust an elven woman after he broke the dragon’s hold over her. Wait, he thought. What had happened to her? And Coach Sprout? And Baclem? And everyone else that had gone through this journey with him? “Where are the others?”

“Things are still very chaotic right now,” Frukeld answered. “Even though you killed the dragon, some of her people remain loyal to her after death. They’re putting up some resistance and a few of your friends and teammates are fighting still. We’ve managed to drive them out of the city. They’re scattered, for the moment, but they’ll regroup and be a problem for us down the road.”

Plex looked around the cheering crowd. The sight of all the races mingling and standing together gave him hope. “What do we do now?”

“We build a better world.”